Welcome to Wilkinson County!

 

Welcome to Wilkinson County, Mississippi Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide visitors with free resources for genealogical and / or historical research.

To share your genealogy or history information, send an email to msghn@outlook.com - we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information related to other Mississippi Counties, consider clicking on the MSGHN link in the Main Menu and visit the appropriate county. Thanks for visiting and good luck with your research!

 



Recently Added...

The following is only a part of what you will find here at Wilkinson County MSGHN.

1805 Territorial Census for Wilkinson County - Includes areas that are present day Wilkinson County, Amite County, Pike County, Walthall County, eastern Marion County, and southern Franklin County.

1792 Natchez District Census - Includes areas that are now Adams County, Jefferson County, and Wilkinson County. Census was taken while Spanish Government had control of this area.

Petty Cemetery - burial listing with tombstone photos. Located near Centreville on Macedonia Road just northwest of Dr. Anderson Road. 310630N, 0910403W.

Lobrano Family Cemetery - burial listing with tombstone photos. Located in Centreville just off Conyer Street N Extension about 1/10 mile north of East Cherokee Street. 310538N, 0910343W.

Wilkinson County Marriages - Thousands of Wilkerson County marriage dates. Very helpful when requesting copies of marriage documents.

Wilkinson County Cemetery List - This is a very extensive list, but I'm sure there are some cemeteries I have missed. If you know of one, please let me know.



About Wilkinson County...

Wilkinson County is located in the southwestern portion of Mississippi on the Louisiana border. Wilkinson County was created in the new Mississippi Territory on January 30, 1802, being the fifth county organized in Mississippi. The territorial governer at the time of Wilkinson County's formation was Gov. William Charles Cole Claiborne. The county was named in honor of U.S. Military leader Gen. James Wilkinson (photo). Wilkinson County was created by an Act of the Mississippi General Assembly:

“The county of Adams shall be divided as follows, to-wit: Beginning on the river Mississippi at the mouth of the Homochitto River, thence running up the Homochitto River to Richards ferry, thence by a line running due east to the western boundary of Washington County; and all that tract of country south of the above described boundary, to the line of demarcation, shall compose a county, which shall be called Wilkinson.”

All of the present-day Wilkinson County was once a part of the old Natchez District, then became partof the now-extinct county of Bourbon. When Adams County was formed it included the area of now Wilkerson County until 1802. This area had some of the earliest white settlements in Mississippi. in the last half of the 1700's, several large settlements had been made in Wilkinson County, favoring areas along the Homochitto River, Buffalo Bayou and the Mississippi River. Most of these early settlers were Anglo-Americans, but some were French as well as Spanish, since those countries had priviously occupied the area.

Migration to the area began in earnest following the end of the Revolutionary war. General Wilkinson came to Natchez in 1798 and later built a military post called Fort Adams on the Mississippi River in what is now Wilkinson County. Fort Adams served as the United States' port of entry on the Mississippi River before the U.S. acquisition of New Orleans. Few counties in the state can boast to having a more distinguished early residents than Wilkinson County. Early residents. This list includes George Poindexter, Daniel Williams, Abram M. Scott, John Joor, Gerard C. Brandon, Joseph Johnson, all members of the Mississippi Constitutional Convention of 1817.

Additionally, Judge Edward McGehee, Peter Smith, father of Coteworth Pinckney Smith, Chief Justice of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, John Dunkley, Thos. Kirkham, John L. Lewis, Archibald McGehee, London Davis, Hugh Davis, Douglas Cooper, Gen. Wm. L. Brandon, and Wm. and James A. Ventress were all early Wilkinson County residents.

Early centers of county governments were Fort Adams and Pinckenyville. Later, Woodville, incorporated in 1811, was named the permanant County Seat. Woodville was located at the terminus of the Bayou Sara and Woodville branch of the Y. & M. V. railroad. This historic railroad was the first railroad in Mississippi, and one of the first to be built in the United States. It was incorporated by Woodville people in 1831, under the name of The West Feliciana Railroad Company.

Other Wilkinson County communities include: Centreville, Crosby, Fort Adams, Pickneyville, Rosetta, and Wilkinson. In it's first census in 1810 there were 5,068 residents listed. In the last federal census in 2000 the population was 10,312.

The county has a total area of 687.66 square miles, of which 676.70 square miles is land and 10.95 square mile (1.59%) is water. The population recorded in the 1810 Federal Census was 5,068. The 2010 census recorded 9,878 residents in the county.

Neigboring counties and parishes are Adams County (north), Franklin County (northeast), Amite County (east), East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana (southeast), West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana (south), and Concordia Parish, Louisiana (west). Communities in the county include Centreville (partly in Amite County), Crosby (partly in Amite County), Woodville, Doloroso, Fort Adams, Pinckneyville, Rosetta, and Wilkinson.

 

 

Wilkinson County Records

Wilkinson County MSGHN has many records here on our website. Marriage Records, Cemetery listings with many tombstone photos, and more. Look at the Wilkinson County Records links in the menu on the left for a list of available data.

Birth Records - The Mississippi Department of Health maintains records of births after November 1, 1912 on file. This was the year Mississippi began keeping official birth records. You can obtain official copies of birth certificates by mail by using this birth record application on their website. If you just have to order by internet or phone, or use a credit card, you can use VitalCheck, a third party records company recogn ized by the Mississippi Dept. of Health. Since there are no official birth records before November 1, 1912 for births prior to that date you will need to determine birth information from census records, bible records, baptismal records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Death Records - The Mississippi Department of Health maintains births recorded after November 1, 1912 on file. This was the year Mississippi began keeping official death records. You can obtain official copies of death certificates by mail by using this death record application on their website. If you just have to order by internet or phone, or use a credit card, you can use VitalCheck, a third party records company recognized by the Mississippi Dept. of Health. Since there are no official death records before November 1, 1912 for deaths prior to that date you will need to determine death information from census records, bible records, funeral home records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Marriage Records - We have thousands of county marriage records here on our website. These dates will assist you greatly in obtaining a copy of the original marriage license. The Mississippi Department of Health can provide you with this for marriages that took place between January 1, 1926 to June 30, 1938, and for January 1, 1942 to present by mail by using this marriage record application on their website. If you just have to order by internet or phone, or use a credit card, you can use VitalCheck, a third party records company recognized by the Mississippi Dept. of Health.

All existing county marriage records for any date not listed above (and for the dates listed above for that matter) may be obtained from the county's Circuit Clerk's office.

Divorce Records - Prior to 1859, divorce proceedings were introduced as private bills in the Mississippi State Legislature. References to these can be found in the books Index of Mississippi Session Acts 1817 - 1865 and Index to the Laws of the Mississippi Territory. These books can be found at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History as well as many other genealogy repositories and libraries across the state. After 1859, county divorce proceedings were filed in the county's Chancery Clerk's office.